SOTA: School of the Arts Singapore
Nuraliah NorasidNuraliah Norasid
Faculty of Literary Arts
Photo by Allan Siew, copyright © 2017 by Epigram Books. Used with permission.

Nuraliah Norasid received both her Bachelor of Arts in English and her PhD in English Literature and Creative Writing from Nanyang Technological University (NTU) in Singapore.


Her doctoral thesis was a work of fiction that utilises the creative form and process to examine and unpack pertinent social issues such as marginality, isolation, and socio-historical traumas. That work resulted in The Gatekeeper, which won the Epigram Books Fiction Prize (EBFP) in 2016. The novel also went on to be shortlisted for the Singapore Literature Prize in 2018 and won the Singapore Book Awards for 'Best Fiction Title' in the same year.


Nuraliah's short fiction has been published in literary journals and collections, such as Quarterly Literary Review Singapore (QLRS), Moving Worlds: A Journal of Transcultural Writing, and Best New Singaporean Short Stories, Volume Three. Her non-fiction writing can be found in Karyawan Magazine, Budi Kritik, and Perempuan: Muslim Women in Singapore Speak Out. For her achievements in the literary arts in Singapore, Nuraliah was awarded the ‘Nanyang Outstanding Young Alumni Award’ from NTU in 2017 and the ‘Most Promising Asian Woman Writer’ in 2018 by IndiaSe Magazine.


Before she joined SOTA, Nuraliah was a research associate at the Centre for Research on Islamic and Malay Affairs (RIMA). There, she researched on a variety of religious, cultural, and social issues, as well as the confluences of all three within Singaporean society.


Nuraliah has taught Creative Writing across the board from the primary school level to that of the university. She believes in the consistency of practice, questioning, exploration and experimentation, and curiosity when it comes to the literary arts, something she brings into her teaching crafts at SOTA. On top of that, Nuraliah is also deeply passionate about people- centred and culturally-nuanced writing, hoping that her students would come to learn to use their craft to make change and highlight the struggles of the less fortunate communities later in their literary futures.


Nuraliah is currently working on a series of short fiction, a novel, and a book on community heritage in Singapore.